PROTEIN: Why it’s important for Wellness, Fitness and Weight Management.

Importance Of Protein for Wellness, Fitness and Weight Management - advancingmindset.com
Importance Of Protein – advancingmindset.com

Take our mini protein challenge

Protein plays a fundamental role in our overall body health and wellness. It helps with weight control and in building, maintaining and repairing muscles. Studies have shown that a meal high in protein can help you feel fuller, longer which helps further with weight management. But how much do we really need? It could be more than you think!

The “average” adult according to the European Food Safety Authority – needs 0.83g of protein per kg of body weight. However this level increases with the level of activity undertaken. that protein’s dietician, Orla Walsh, says that active adults and those training should consume between 1.2g to 1.5g protein per kg of body weight per day depending on the level of intensity of the exercise. It is considered safe to consume up to 1.6g protein per kg of body weight per day.

Many people may not know that Pregnant women require additional intake of 1g, 9g and 28 g per day for the first, second and third trimesters respectively and Breast-feeding women need an additional intake of 19g per day during the first 6 months and 13g per day thereafter. Infants, children and adolescents require between 0.83 g and 1.31 g of protein per kg of body weight per day depending on age.

If you are a vegetarian or vegan you may find getting enough protein more of a challenge simply because there are fewer protein sources available and less “grab and go” availability.

So what does protein DO for us?


At the most basic level protein is needed for every cell in the body – so to be healthy and well and to have the best possible body, skin, hair, nails you must get the correct amount of protein every day.

Muscles are made of protein and protein maintains, repairs and builds muscle. The more muscle you have the faster your metabolism goes and a healthy metabolism is key to lowering body fat and maintaining a healthy body fat percentage which is beneficial for our health throughout our lives.

If you are active, a protein shake or adding protein to a smoothie after activity will help repair muscles and replenish the body. A great choice is that protein 2in1 Plant Protein Super Foods as the range also contains not only organic plant protein but added nutrition like vitamin C for reducing tiredness and fatigue and supporting a healthy immune system.

Don’t forget that muscles are not just located externally but also internally; e.g. the heart is a muscle. Our muscles are constantly breaking down and repairing and they need protein for fuel and repair. Without adequate protein the body will stop functioning at optimum level and illness could follow.

How to enjoy a Plant Based Diet - advancingmindset.com
How to enjoy a Plant Based Diet – advancingmindset.com

So is that all we need to know?


Not quite. Firstly all proteins are not equal. Some will come with attendant saturated fat (think e.g. red meat, or cheese) and other sources can be highly processed, contain artificial ingredients or be high in refined sugars.

Secondly some proteins are not complete proteins. That is they do not contain all the essential amino acids the body needs every day to be healthy and well but can’t make itself. These are: Leucine, Isoleucine, Lysine, Methionine, Histidine, Phenylalanine, Threonine, Tryptophan and Valine. As the body can’t make these amino acids we must get them from our food.

Finally, its not just the amount of protein we need to be aware of but also when we need to consume that amount. The body can only process and utilise so much protein at one sitting so key to protein consumption is to spread it evenly across the day.

So… to make sure you are getting your protein consumption right, why not take this mini protein challenge with 5 easy steps?

The 5 Easy Steps


1.Start in the morning by working out how much protein you need to eat that day based on the above reference intakes, your lifestyle and your exercise levels.

2.Write down in a notebook how much protein you actually consume that day.

3.Consider the kind of protein you are consuming and how that fits with your lifestyle and health priorities e.g. is it organic? Is it low in saturated fat? Free from chemicals and additives? Free from refined sugar? Lactose free? Vegan? You decide!

4.Be aware of when you are consuming your protein and if you are having it throughout the day – don’t just add up the total amount of protein – it must be taken throughout the day.

5.Conclude if you are getting your protein intake right or need to make changes.

Consuming the right type and the right amount of protein for your lifestyle and exercise level at the right time will ensure you support your total body health and wellness and help you attain your fitness and weight management goals.

that protein is a range of Organic Plant Protein Super Food Fusions developed by nutritionists.

It comes in four variants;

I Heart Pumpkin and Chia Seed Super Protein

Happy Happy Hemp and Baobab Super Protein

Blissful Brown Rice and Raw Cacao Super Protein

Chirpy Chirpy Choca Mocha Super Protein

How to Enjoy a Plant Based Diet

How to enjoy a Plant Based Diet - advancingmindset.com
How to enjoy a Plant Based Diet – advancingmindset.com

There is no one right way to eat for everyone. We are all different and what works for one person may not work for the next. However with more and more people choosing to follow a vegan lifestyle I hope this plant-based eating article will be of interest.

The extent to which plant-based sources can provide excellent sources of nutrition is endless. With a balanced vegan diet, you can help yourself become the healthiest version of yourself. For those starting Veganuary this month, these minimally processed substitute animal products can be seen as ideal replacements.

Tofu and tempeh:
versatile protein-rich alternatives to meat, fish, poultry and eggs.

Legumes:
Beans, lentils and peas are excellent sources of many nutrients.

Nuts and nut butters:
Most nuts are good sources of iron, fibre, magnesium, zinc, selenium and vitamin E with almonds, walnuts and pistachios the most nutritious varieties.

Seeds:
Hemp, chia and flaxseeds are also sources of protein and omega-3 fatty acids Alpha linoleic Acid (ALA). That Protein I Heart Pumpkin and Chia Seeds Super Protein is a great source of ALA.

Calcium-fortified plant milks and yoghurts:
In order to achieve your recommend daily allowance of calcium, opt for fortified varieties with vitamins B12 and D.

Algae:
Spirulina chlorella are sources of complete protein that aren’t animal based, they have added bonus of containing Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA), the most active Omega-3 fatty acid.

Whole grains:
Spelt, amaranth, brown rice protein and quinoa (technically a seed) are all great sources of complex carbs, fibre, iron, B-vitamins and are especially high in protein.

Sprouted and fermented plant foods:
Tempeh, miso, sauerkraut and kimchi all contain probiotics and vitamin K2.

Fruits and vegetables:
Leafy greens such as spinach, kale and bok choy are both particularly high in iron, calcium and other key nutrients.

40 Inspiring Love Quotes advancingmindset.com
40 Inspiring Love Quotes

WHAT ARE THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF A PLANT-BASED DIET?


Plant-based diets have an array of health benefits including a 15% lower risk of developing or dying from a cancer, reducing symptoms of arthritis and reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Those that follow a plant-based diet also tend to be slimmer than those who don’t, with studies demonstrating vegans have a lower body mass index (BMI) than non-vegans. This lower BMI trend may be caused by a higher dietary fibre with a vegan diet intake which can make you feel fuller. For such health benefits to come to fruition, a well-planned diet that limits processed foods and embraces organic and nutrient-rich ones is crucial. Those who follow poorly planned plant-based diets – just as with badly planned omnivore diets – are at risk of certain nutrient deficiencies. These include a significantly higher risk of having inadequate levels of vitamin B12, vitamin D, omega-3s, iodine, iron, calcium and zinc.

These nutritional requirements are particularly important for children and pregnant women as development can be hindered through nutritional deficiencies. There are however particular elements that every plant-based diet should be aware of.

5 POTENTIAL PLANT-BASED NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCIES


Protein
A common concern amongst plant-based diets is a lack of sufficient protein. Higher protein diets promote muscle strength and satiety. Protein is of course vital for muscle and bone health but also for our cellular structure, even affecting our skin and hair. With about 20% of the human body made up of protein and as our bodies don’t store protein, it’s important to get an adequate amount from your diet every single day. Thankfully, there are plenty of delicious, protein rich plant-based foods to consider including tofu, lentils, quinoa, hemp, chia and beans.

That Protein is a plant based range of organic super proteins that are all organic and cold pressed and an excellent and easy way to add protein and nutrition to your vegan diet.

You can add to all you fav recipes or make protein shakes. It is also important to vary your sources of protein throughout the day, as each provides different amino acids, vitamins and minerals that are all uniquely important for your health.

Vitamin B12
Vitamin B12 is a water soluble vitamin that is involved in the function of every cell in the body.

It is particularly important in the formation of blood and the function of the brain. As B12 is critical for life is by far the most important nutrient that plant-based eaters must be concerned with. Palmyra Nectar is an excellent way to get B12 and a range of B vitamins into a vegan diet as this sweet superfood is extremely high in all the B Vits. Nutritional Yeast like Marmite will also add B12.

Vitamin D
The type of Vitamin D we get from the sun isn’t always enough, especially in colder countries such as the UK. This issue is so apparent that it is now widely recommended that everyone supplements with vitamin D in winter months.

With studies suggesting vegans are up to 74% more likely to be deficient that meat eaters, fortified milk alternatives should be consumed.

Omega-3
Omega-3 containing foods, especially those high in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), can help the body produce longer-chain omega-3s such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Foods rich in Omega-3 include, hemp, flaxseeds, walnuts and soybeans.

A daily intake of 200–300mg of EPA and DHA from an algae oil supplement is an alternative preventive measure against Omega-3 deficiency.

Iron
Despite a plentiful dark leafy green diet, without vitamin C very little iron is absorbed and any benefits won’t be obtained. Additionally, the type of iron in plant-based sources contain non-haem iron which is very difficult to be absorbed effectively. With too much iron causing serious health complications, iron supplementation should only be considered where there is documented deficiency.

If these potential deficiencies are enough to consider a complete plant-based diet one step too far, meat-free Mondays are a great way to dip your toe in the water.

A TYPICAL MEAT-FREE MONDAY FOOD DIARY


Breakfast: Porridge with That Protein I Heart Pumpkin and Chia Seed Raw Vegan Super protein is a great start. With almond milk and topped with almond nut butter and a handful of raspberries.

Lunch: Quinoa falafel on a bed of spinach, peppers and pomegranate topped with flaxseed and seeds.

Snack: Brown rice cakes with hummus.

Dinner: An Asian stir fry with tons of vegetables and bok choy, complete with some baked tofu.

Dessert: Fortified coconut yoghurt with blueberries topped with crushed nuts That Protein’s Blissful Brown Rice and Raw Cacao Super Protein and some cacao nibs.