Importance of Nutrition

Energetic Young Couple Having Fun -advancingmindset
Energetic Young Couple Having Fun -advancingmindset

Nutrition plays a huge role in ageing well… it can help us to live long happy lives and continue to look and feel our best! There are so many things to consider when aiming for optimal nutrition, but here are our top ones!!

1) Fruit and vegetables.


They provide nutrients called phytocompounds that help prevent many debilitating conditions and diseases that will get in the way of living life to the full.

What’s more they provide the body with vitamins and minerals, particularly the antioxidant Vitamins A, C and E. Antioxidants are necessary to reduce the ageing process… they help stabilise harmful ‘free radicals’ that are formed by pollution and activities of daily life.

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However, what fruit and veg are famous for are their high fibre content. This fibre not only helps to keep our gut healthy and moving, but is also needed to optimise energy levels and for weight control. So be sure to have some fruit or veg with every meal!

2) Protein.


As we age we lose muscle mass (sarcopenia) and this has implications for body tone and also fat burning – the less muscle you have the less fat we will burn.

Exercise is key as we age and so too is replenishing protein levels. Protein helps keep our metabolism running at the speed it should, keeps muscles strong, and also helps ensure satiety at meal times to help us avoid that temptation to overindulge.

This helps us to control our weight and either achieve or maintain a healthy weight which is necessary for both our quantity and quality of life. The “average” person needs 0.83g of protein per kg of body weight but depending on activity levels a safe range is up to 1.6g per kg of body weight.

Importantly, those levels needs to be consumed throughout the day. Adding protein to breakfast or having a protein shake in the morning or mid afternoon will be a good way to increase protein.

3) Fat.


Once shunned because it was believed to lead to ill-health and weight gain, research is now bringing to light the importance of ensuring you get plenty of the good healthy fats in your diet to optimize health!

The fats that are often lacking in diets include omega 9 and omega 3 fatty acids. Good sources of these fats include oily fish, oils such as olive and rapeseed, most nuts and seeds including walnuts, chia seeds, flax seed or linseed.

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The Science of Getting Rich Chapter 1
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Affirmations For Public Speaking

Healthy fats play an important role in keeping our skin and joints healthy, supporting our nervous and cardiovascular system and even play an important structural role in our brain and eyes!

4) Eat for Energy


Energy can get depleted for all kinds of reasons but if you have ruled out a medical reason then your nutrition quite possibly needs an overhaul!

Whilst the individual nutrients needed for energy are key, what people can overlook is that the starting point for energy is having a BALANCED diet.

Why is this important for energy?

Most people know that we need carbohydrates for energy but that’s just the start as eating only carbohydrates would cause energy highs and lows.

What’s very important is to ensure that there is enough balancing protein, fat and fibre in what you eat to slow down the release of carbohydrates to create a steady absorption of glucose into the bloodstream.

Recommended Daily Amount

In terms of vitamins and minerals it’s important to get the correct recommended daily amount of these every day and preferably from your food for optimal bioavailablity.

Some of the headline vitamins and minerals to look out for (a lack of which could affect your energy levels) are: vitamin C which helps reduce tiredness and fatigue and supports a normal immune system: iron as low levels of iron can make you tired (iron also helps the absorption of vitamin C): zinc, manganese, and the B vitamins (not an exhaustive list).

Ultimate Energy Shake

Taking all this into consideration the nutritionists at that protein have developed their “Ultimate Energy Shake” which is high in plant proteins, fibre, healthy fats and vitamin C as well as containing other vitamins and minerals. Having a shake a day should help towards feeling your most energetic you! You can get the recipe here.

More recipes and information can be found here.

ENERGISING PROTEIN SHAKE

Ingredients

x 250ml Almond Milk

x 2-3 tablespoons that Protein’s Happy Happy Hemp and Baobab Super Protein

x 8 chunks pineapple

x 50 ml pineapple juice

x tbsp of avocado

x tsp lime

x 1/2 tsp cinnamon

x cinnamon to sprinkle

If you like a sweeter shake add 2 tbsps of Agave Nectar for a low GI option

INSTRUCTIONS

Put all ingredients in blender, blend well, sprinkle with cinnamon and serve immediately.


How to Enjoy a Plant Based Diet

How to enjoy a Plant Based Diet - advancingmindset.com
How to enjoy a Plant Based Diet – advancingmindset.com

There is no one right way to eat for everyone. We are all different and what works for one person may not work for the next. However with more and more people choosing to follow a vegan lifestyle I hope this plant-based eating article will be of interest.

The extent to which plant-based sources can provide excellent sources of nutrition is endless. With a balanced vegan diet, you can help yourself become the healthiest version of yourself. For those starting Veganuary this month, these minimally processed substitute animal products can be seen as ideal replacements.

Tofu and tempeh:
versatile protein-rich alternatives to meat, fish, poultry and eggs.

Legumes:
Beans, lentils and peas are excellent sources of many nutrients.

Nuts and nut butters:
Most nuts are good sources of iron, fibre, magnesium, zinc, selenium and vitamin E with almonds, walnuts and pistachios the most nutritious varieties.

Seeds:
Hemp, chia and flaxseeds are also sources of protein and omega-3 fatty acids Alpha linoleic Acid (ALA). That Protein I Heart Pumpkin and Chia Seeds Super Protein is a great source of ALA.

Calcium-fortified plant milks and yoghurts:
In order to achieve your recommend daily allowance of calcium, opt for fortified varieties with vitamins B12 and D.

Algae:
Spirulina chlorella are sources of complete protein that aren’t animal based, they have added bonus of containing Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA), the most active Omega-3 fatty acid.

Whole grains:
Spelt, amaranth, brown rice protein and quinoa (technically a seed) are all great sources of complex carbs, fibre, iron, B-vitamins and are especially high in protein.

Sprouted and fermented plant foods:
Tempeh, miso, sauerkraut and kimchi all contain probiotics and vitamin K2.

Fruits and vegetables:
Leafy greens such as spinach, kale and bok choy are both particularly high in iron, calcium and other key nutrients.

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40 Inspiring Love Quotes

WHAT ARE THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF A PLANT-BASED DIET?


Plant-based diets have an array of health benefits including a 15% lower risk of developing or dying from a cancer, reducing symptoms of arthritis and reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Those that follow a plant-based diet also tend to be slimmer than those who don’t, with studies demonstrating vegans have a lower body mass index (BMI) than non-vegans. This lower BMI trend may be caused by a higher dietary fibre with a vegan diet intake which can make you feel fuller. For such health benefits to come to fruition, a well-planned diet that limits processed foods and embraces organic and nutrient-rich ones is crucial. Those who follow poorly planned plant-based diets – just as with badly planned omnivore diets – are at risk of certain nutrient deficiencies. These include a significantly higher risk of having inadequate levels of vitamin B12, vitamin D, omega-3s, iodine, iron, calcium and zinc.

These nutritional requirements are particularly important for children and pregnant women as development can be hindered through nutritional deficiencies. There are however particular elements that every plant-based diet should be aware of.

5 POTENTIAL PLANT-BASED NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCIES


Protein
A common concern amongst plant-based diets is a lack of sufficient protein. Higher protein diets promote muscle strength and satiety. Protein is of course vital for muscle and bone health but also for our cellular structure, even affecting our skin and hair. With about 20% of the human body made up of protein and as our bodies don’t store protein, it’s important to get an adequate amount from your diet every single day. Thankfully, there are plenty of delicious, protein rich plant-based foods to consider including tofu, lentils, quinoa, hemp, chia and beans.

That Protein is a plant based range of organic super proteins that are all organic and cold pressed and an excellent and easy way to add protein and nutrition to your vegan diet.

You can add to all you fav recipes or make protein shakes. It is also important to vary your sources of protein throughout the day, as each provides different amino acids, vitamins and minerals that are all uniquely important for your health.

Vitamin B12
Vitamin B12 is a water soluble vitamin that is involved in the function of every cell in the body.

It is particularly important in the formation of blood and the function of the brain. As B12 is critical for life is by far the most important nutrient that plant-based eaters must be concerned with. Palmyra Nectar is an excellent way to get B12 and a range of B vitamins into a vegan diet as this sweet superfood is extremely high in all the B Vits. Nutritional Yeast like Marmite will also add B12.

Vitamin D
The type of Vitamin D we get from the sun isn’t always enough, especially in colder countries such as the UK. This issue is so apparent that it is now widely recommended that everyone supplements with vitamin D in winter months.

With studies suggesting vegans are up to 74% more likely to be deficient that meat eaters, fortified milk alternatives should be consumed.

Omega-3
Omega-3 containing foods, especially those high in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), can help the body produce longer-chain omega-3s such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Foods rich in Omega-3 include, hemp, flaxseeds, walnuts and soybeans.

A daily intake of 200–300mg of EPA and DHA from an algae oil supplement is an alternative preventive measure against Omega-3 deficiency.

Iron
Despite a plentiful dark leafy green diet, without vitamin C very little iron is absorbed and any benefits won’t be obtained. Additionally, the type of iron in plant-based sources contain non-haem iron which is very difficult to be absorbed effectively. With too much iron causing serious health complications, iron supplementation should only be considered where there is documented deficiency.

If these potential deficiencies are enough to consider a complete plant-based diet one step too far, meat-free Mondays are a great way to dip your toe in the water.

A TYPICAL MEAT-FREE MONDAY FOOD DIARY


Breakfast: Porridge with That Protein I Heart Pumpkin and Chia Seed Raw Vegan Super protein is a great start. With almond milk and topped with almond nut butter and a handful of raspberries.

Lunch: Quinoa falafel on a bed of spinach, peppers and pomegranate topped with flaxseed and seeds.

Snack: Brown rice cakes with hummus.

Dinner: An Asian stir fry with tons of vegetables and bok choy, complete with some baked tofu.

Dessert: Fortified coconut yoghurt with blueberries topped with crushed nuts That Protein’s Blissful Brown Rice and Raw Cacao Super Protein and some cacao nibs.